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9 January 2020

SPOON, FORK OR BRANCH?




Well, you won’t need a spoon to develop in the HR Open Github environment. Forking and branching are two methods for deviating from the Main (approved and deployed) code. A branch is part of the original repository, whereas a fork is a copy of the original repository.  HR Open recommends our workgroups use branches.

The membership approved/deployed code is stored in the Main branch and the workgroup approved code is stored in the Development branch.

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As workgroups follow the development process, we track all changes using the Github Issues tool. This allows us to assign a person to the issue, prioritize it, and provide comments.

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When the schema editor makes changes for an open issue, the editor creates a new branch from the development branch. Once the changes are complete, the editor can create a pull request to be reviewed by the team or the TSC. Then the issue branch can be merged into development and deleted.

If you’d like to learn more about our workgroup process or want to get involved, contact Kim Bartkus.

9 January 2020

DO YOU WIKI?




Did you know that the term WikiWiki is Hawaiian for “fast; quick.” At HR Open, we use Wiki for collaborative editing of our documentation. HR Open is a global community of volunteers, dispersed throughout numerous time zones, so we can’t always communicate through conference calls.

The process for developing standards for a particular domain include:

  • Overview: this ensures everyone understands the purpose and scope of the project
  • Define the Actors: systems or roles that communicate to each other via the standard
  • Use Cases: stories of the business process and where the standards will be utilized; can include actors, diagrams, and sample data
  • Throughout the whole process we define terminology and implementation guidelines

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All of this documentation helps business analysts understand the process and implementers develop their products using the standards much more quickly. Keep in mind, this is a collaborative process, so the finished product is a standard that has years of knowledge and experience behind it.

Once the workgroup has completed the project, the Wiki is converted into online documentation available to the public for free.

If you’d like to learn more about our workgroup process or want to get involved, contact Kim Bartkus.

9 January 2020

BUILDING BLOCKS FOR HR OPEN STANDARDS




Github is a great developer and collaboration tool, especially for HR Open’s distributed standards development projects. Although HR Open uses Github as intended, we wanted to share some notes on our usage guidelines within the workgroups.

Every workgroup is created based on a domain and each domain has its own repository. A complete list of domain repositories includes:

  • Assessments
  • Benefits
  • Compensation
  • Common*
  • Interviewing
  • Payroll
  • Referrals
  • Screening
  • Timecard
  • TSC Repositories*
  • Wellness

* Managed by the Technical Steering Committee (TSC), these repositories are used for technical guidelines, tools, and other TSC related work.

The Common repository contains all of the shared information between the other domains. For example, all base data types (identifier, indicator, date, etc.) and all structures (person name, communication, organization, etc.) common to the workgroups are stored here to allow reuse of the shared components. This eliminates the need for multiple, similar structures and reduces development and maintenance time. So, before you create a new data type, check out the common repository to see if we already have the content!

Within each repository, we typically have a WIP folder for documentation and minutes, a JSON folder, and an XML folder. Within the two schema folders, you will find the noun and reusable schema, a top-level schema containing a list of all domain nouns, and a sample folder of all domain instances.

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All workgroup members have read/write access to their domain repository and read access to the common repository. The TSC have read/write access to all repositories. Once the standards have been approved, they are released to the public for free.

If you’d like to learn more about our repositories or want to get involved, contact Kim Bartkus.