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29 January 2020

PEOPLE ANALYTICS IN STANDARDS IMPLEMENTATIONS




Guest Blog Post: Dr. Michael Moon, People Analytics Leader | ADP

Imagine if you were asked to buy a house without ever seeing it. Your real estate agent tells you it has everything you asked for and you should trust her because she has had 100% success in predicting her client’s happiness with their purchase. Would you buy it?

What if you were planning a trip to an imaginary island, let’s call it Peopletopia, and the one person you know that has been there said you don’t need sunscreen in Peopletopia because it is so far away from any major continents that the sun has little to no impact on your skin. This is someone you were recently introduced to, who coincidentally, also happens to have a PhD. You burn easily and have a family history of skin cancer. Do you go without your sunscreen?

What if everywhere you ever worked people were allowed to wear any color shirt they wanted work, but now at your new job you are told you can wear any color but purple. You ask why and you are told because a very well-known thought leader presented research that purple clothing causes increased conflict in the workplace, more than any other color. Do you believe it?

Okay, so maybe the last scenarios are a little silly or far-fetched, but hopefully you get the point. Most of us do not do things on blind faith, like the first scenario, or make serious life-decisions based on information from only one source like the second scenario, even if that source is the world’s most renowned expert on a topic like the third scenario. So why, if we wouldn’t do these things in our personal lives, would we do them as HR Professionals?

So much of what we do as HR professionals and people managers in our organizations today are actually based upon faulty logic, inappropriate application of research, based on what we think makes sense, or what we read in the latest article in XYZ Magazine. And sometimes, we do them simply because it is what we have always done.

Even worse than faulty logic, and absolutely fundamental to making the most effective decisions about an organization’s people, is the importance of establishing standards for how data is stored, retrieved and used as part of HR decision-making.

Whether we are talking about the new ISO standards on human capital management reporting launched in 2019 (ISO 30414) or standards in how you define various HR measures and metrics, developing standards is a crucial part of using People Analytics to help unravel HR mysteries and facilitate better strategic value for your organization.

HR Open Standards not only provides the forum for people to come together to discuss, establish, and define the standards but it also provides an avenue for technologists to converse about their need and solve problems. If you’d like to learn more register to attend my session “People Analytics in Standards Implementations” at the HR Open 2020 Annual Meeting.

4 May 2015

How Standards Bolster Innovation




Written by: Romuald Restout

A Quick Look into the Past

 

Towards the end of the 19th century, electrical engineering became one of the core engines of the second industrial revolution. As Nicholas Carr put it, in “The Big Switch,” manufacturing energy provided factories “with a decisive advantage over other manufacturers. The company was able to expand the yield and efficiency of its factory. […] Like other factories of the time, they were as much in the business of manufacturing energy as manufacturing goods”. This of course, quickly changed, as power plants started to rise and provide energy at a low-cost to everyone.

An aspect that is often overlooked in that story is that none of this could have happened without the emergence of standards.

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22 April 2015

Standards are Worthless Unless You Use Them




Written by: Mike Seidle

A good standard is one everyone uses.

Well, duh, right?

While I was on the board of directors for an international standards consortium (HR Open Standards), the biggest battle has always been getting developers to use the standard.  When we did, we got amazing things to happen, like getting 18 states to start providing compliance receipts for job deliveries in just a few months. Like enabling entire marketplaces.

Nearly everyone who I’m aware of who launched an HR Open initiative has finished quickly for a few reasons:

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11 July 2012

Distributed Systems for Payroll Data Exchange




The HR Open Standards Payroll workgroup has been very active in developing standards for a variety of business needs. Our original scope was to focus on transactions between the HRIS as the System of Record and the Payroll System. We’ve recently decided to expand that focus to handle Distributed System of Record. Many organizations exchange data with internal or 3rd party systems and need to provision/sync those systems throughout the employment life cycle. The following diagram shows one scenario we are considering, where each system is its own System of Record.

The final specifications will include a narrative and associated xml instance(s) describing the ‘day in the life of the new hire’. We will also include business rules for each use case to help business analysts and developers with their implementations. We realize there are other environments in addition to the two noted here (HRIS as SOR, Distributed SORs). Most of them are not as common, but we invite you to share other scenarios.

5 June 2012

8 Reasons Why Standards Like HR-XML Save Software Development Time




I’m John Kleeman, Chairman of Questionmark, the assessment management systems company. Here is why open specifications and standards like HR-XML save effort when developing software.

Suppose you are responsible for application A, and your customer needs it to integrate with application B. How do you do this?

One option is to build a proprietary interface, where you write code which connects A to B directly.

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12 May 2012

SETU: HR-XML in the Netherlands




Written by: Jasper Roes

Since the start of SETU in 2007, SETU has been active in customizing the international HR-XML standard for use in the flexible staffing industry in the Netherlands. A lot of work has been done in the nearly five years that the SETU exists. Standards were developed to exchange requests for quotes, offers, assignments, timecards, and invoices. These SETU standards define the information that is exchanged, while the technical format for the exchange is the HR-XML 2.5 standards.

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22 April 2012

Interoperability between Europass CV and HR-XML




Prior to the HR-XML 3.0 Candidate schema, the Cedefop (the European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training) developed its own internal XML schema to store and edit Europass CV using their website CV editor. Starting 2008, they have published free opensource tools such as XML transformation sheet to help cross interoperability with the HR-XML candidate specifications (v2.5 as well as v3.x) based on the Europass CV HR-XML Application Profile document.
What is Europass?

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