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29 January 2020

PEOPLE ANALYTICS IN STANDARDS IMPLEMENTATIONS




Guest Blog Post: Dr. Michael Moon, People Analytics Leader | ADP

Imagine if you were asked to buy a house without ever seeing it. Your real estate agent tells you it has everything you asked for and you should trust her because she has had 100% success in predicting her client’s happiness with their purchase. Would you buy it?

What if you were planning a trip to an imaginary island, let’s call it Peopletopia, and the one person you know that has been there said you don’t need sunscreen in Peopletopia because it is so far away from any major continents that the sun has little to no impact on your skin. This is someone you were recently introduced to, who coincidentally, also happens to have a PhD. You burn easily and have a family history of skin cancer. Do you go without your sunscreen?

What if everywhere you ever worked people were allowed to wear any color shirt they wanted work, but now at your new job you are told you can wear any color but purple. You ask why and you are told because a very well-known thought leader presented research that purple clothing causes increased conflict in the workplace, more than any other color. Do you believe it?

Okay, so maybe the last scenarios are a little silly or far-fetched, but hopefully you get the point. Most of us do not do things on blind faith, like the first scenario, or make serious life-decisions based on information from only one source like the second scenario, even if that source is the world’s most renowned expert on a topic like the third scenario. So why, if we wouldn’t do these things in our personal lives, would we do them as HR Professionals?

So much of what we do as HR professionals and people managers in our organizations today are actually based upon faulty logic, inappropriate application of research, based on what we think makes sense, or what we read in the latest article in XYZ Magazine. And sometimes, we do them simply because it is what we have always done.

Even worse than faulty logic, and absolutely fundamental to making the most effective decisions about an organization’s people, is the importance of establishing standards for how data is stored, retrieved and used as part of HR decision-making.

Whether we are talking about the new ISO standards on human capital management reporting launched in 2019 (ISO 30414) or standards in how you define various HR measures and metrics, developing standards is a crucial part of using People Analytics to help unravel HR mysteries and facilitate better strategic value for your organization.

HR Open Standards not only provides the forum for people to come together to discuss, establish, and define the standards but it also provides an avenue for technologists to converse about their need and solve problems. If you’d like to learn more register to attend my session “People Analytics in Standards Implementations” at the HR Open 2020 Annual Meeting.

9 January 2020

LEARN THE MYSTERY BEHIND HR OPEN STANDARDS




Every year we hold an informational webinar to introduce the Consortium to new members and show how our workgroups and projects operate. This is also a great opportunity to remind our members about the important work we do, how to be a part of it, and how we benefit the HR technology community.

As a voluntary consensus standards consortium, HR Open is dedicated to the development of free, global HR vocabularies available to all HR professionals and organizations. We’re a community of professionals from around the world that collaborate on HR data exchange standards to deliver interoperability framework for HR trading partners.

Some key takeaways from our webinar:

  • Our project methodology walks you through the process of starting a new implementation standard:
    • Proposal: What is the issue and how do we plan to solve it?
    • Development: Workgroups meet virtually (via GitHub) to develop standards and documentation to resolve the issues.
    • Review/Approval: Once workgroup tasks are complete, the project is sent to the Technical Steering Committee to validate and make sure it matches the common area rules. Board and membership approve before schema becomes public.
  • Project teams include people with different skillsets – those to develop use cases, create schema, and write stories.
  • Get involved! Join the Business Steering Committee (marketing the Consortium), Meeting Planning Committee (planning and executing events), or Technical Steering Committee (reviewing schema and data).
  • Standards and Workgroups include:
    • Assessments
    • Compensation
    • Contingent Staffing
    • Data Protection
    • Employee Benefits
    • Employee Referrals
    • Indicative Data
    • Interviewing
    • Payroll
    • Recruiting
    • Screening
    • Talent Management
    • Time and Attendance
    • Wellness
    • Workforce Analytics

As an organization with 20 years of experience you know we can deliver credible and established standards. What we do matters, not only can it save you time and money but also provides a forum for you to interact with other HR technologists.

View the slideshow presentation and visit our website to learn about the benefits of becoming a member!

9 January 2020

SPOON, FORK OR BRANCH?




Well, you won’t need a spoon to develop in the HR Open Github environment. Forking and branching are two methods for deviating from the Main (approved and deployed) code. A branch is part of the original repository, whereas a fork is a copy of the original repository.  HR Open recommends our workgroups use branches.

The membership approved/deployed code is stored in the Main branch and the workgroup approved code is stored in the Development branch.

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As workgroups follow the development process, we track all changes using the Github Issues tool. This allows us to assign a person to the issue, prioritize it, and provide comments.

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When the schema editor makes changes for an open issue, the editor creates a new branch from the development branch. Once the changes are complete, the editor can create a pull request to be reviewed by the team or the TSC. Then the issue branch can be merged into development and deleted.

If you’d like to learn more about our workgroup process or want to get involved, contact Kim Bartkus.

9 January 2020

GUEST BLOG POST: FROM DAY ONE DENVER CONFERENCE WITH JIM COLLINS




This blog post is in partnership with From Day One. Click here for the original post and visit their website for more information.

LASTING SECRETS OF SUCCESS, FROM THE GURU OF GREAT COMPANIES

BY CYNTHIA BARNES  |  OCTOBER 29, 2019
“You just get up and you start marching,” says author, teacher and consultant Jim Collins. “You always have a friend right when you wake up in the morning and there’s this monster project that is going to take you years to do.” For Collins, his “monster project” has been research into long-term corporate success (and failure), research that has led to authoring and co-authoring six bestselling books, including Good to Great and Built To Last.

Speaking at October’s From Day One conference in Denver, Collins shared his business insights and told the audience about his research over the past 30 years, his plans for his next project, and the spreadsheet organization he uses to get it all done.

“The rule is very simple: I have to hit above 1,000 creative hours every 365-day cycle. That’s how you get these big projects done. You just do that,” he said, echoing one of the enduring concepts he distilled in his research.

There are other advantages that accrue from such sustained focus. “It gives you a chance to really go deep,” Collins told From Day One co-founder Steve Koepp during the one-on-one conversation. “I also find the insights deepen over time. If you stay in the work⁠—stay deep in the actual work⁠—then over time, you will have something that might be worthy to share.”

What Collins has discovered in his research has proven worthy of teaching to corporations like Amazon, MBA students at Stanford, and cadets at West Point. In addition to compiling 6,000 years of combined corporate history, he’s also done immersive studies in health care, government and education.

“⁠I’ve been really lucky,” said Collins. “I think luck’s important in life. But what really is the most critical kind of luck is ‘who’ luck—people who touch your life.”

It’s ultimately all about people. “Great vision without great people is irrelevant,” Collins insisted. “If you always start with the idea that you begin first and foremost, everything, with building around people and getting the right people for what you’re trying to do in the kind of company are trying to build, then ‘who’ comes before ‘why.’ That makes a great life.”


To read the full article visit https://www.fromdayone.co/2019/10/29/lasting-secrets-of-success-from-the-guru-of-great-companies/

From Day One, a forum on corporate values, is heading to Gilley’s, Dallas on November 6, 2019. To review the day’s agenda and get tickets click here: https://dallas19.fromdayone.co/.

Join us, and as an HR Open subscriber, you receive an exclusive, 10% discount on registration with the offer code HROPEN.

9 January 2020

DO YOU WIKI?




Did you know that the term WikiWiki is Hawaiian for “fast; quick.” At HR Open, we use Wiki for collaborative editing of our documentation. HR Open is a global community of volunteers, dispersed throughout numerous time zones, so we can’t always communicate through conference calls.

The process for developing standards for a particular domain include:

  • Overview: this ensures everyone understands the purpose and scope of the project
  • Define the Actors: systems or roles that communicate to each other via the standard
  • Use Cases: stories of the business process and where the standards will be utilized; can include actors, diagrams, and sample data
  • Throughout the whole process we define terminology and implementation guidelines

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All of this documentation helps business analysts understand the process and implementers develop their products using the standards much more quickly. Keep in mind, this is a collaborative process, so the finished product is a standard that has years of knowledge and experience behind it.

Once the workgroup has completed the project, the Wiki is converted into online documentation available to the public for free.

If you’d like to learn more about our workgroup process or want to get involved, contact Kim Bartkus.

9 January 2020

BUILDING BLOCKS FOR HR OPEN STANDARDS




Github is a great developer and collaboration tool, especially for HR Open’s distributed standards development projects. Although HR Open uses Github as intended, we wanted to share some notes on our usage guidelines within the workgroups.

Every workgroup is created based on a domain and each domain has its own repository. A complete list of domain repositories includes:

  • Assessments
  • Benefits
  • Compensation
  • Common*
  • Interviewing
  • Payroll
  • Referrals
  • Screening
  • Timecard
  • TSC Repositories*
  • Wellness

* Managed by the Technical Steering Committee (TSC), these repositories are used for technical guidelines, tools, and other TSC related work.

The Common repository contains all of the shared information between the other domains. For example, all base data types (identifier, indicator, date, etc.) and all structures (person name, communication, organization, etc.) common to the workgroups are stored here to allow reuse of the shared components. This eliminates the need for multiple, similar structures and reduces development and maintenance time. So, before you create a new data type, check out the common repository to see if we already have the content!

Within each repository, we typically have a WIP folder for documentation and minutes, a JSON folder, and an XML folder. Within the two schema folders, you will find the noun and reusable schema, a top-level schema containing a list of all domain nouns, and a sample folder of all domain instances.

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All workgroup members have read/write access to their domain repository and read access to the common repository. The TSC have read/write access to all repositories. Once the standards have been approved, they are released to the public for free.

If you’d like to learn more about our repositories or want to get involved, contact Kim Bartkus.

9 January 2020

HR OPEN STANDARDS: A HISTORY




HR Open Standards is celebrating its 20th Anniversary this year. We want to share some of our milestones with you and show you how we got to be the only independent, non-profit, volunteer-led organization dedicated to the development and promotion of a standard suite of specifications to enable human resource related data exchanges.

HR Open Standards: A Timeline

1999 |Formation: First discussion about formation of a consortium in Alexandria, VA which results in HR-XML Consortium Inc. being organized in December 1999

2000 |1st Meeting: First HR-XML meeting in January. HR-XML releases DTD specification for Recruiting and Benefits

2001 |HR-XML: August 2001 released first XML standards

2003 |Product Certification: HR-XML introduces its first Product Certification Program

2003 |Additional Releases: Release HR-XML 2.0 and 2.5 Standards

2009 |HR-XML 3.0: Release HR-XML 3.0 and specifications

2012 |Online Training: Announce online training courses to support growing adoptions

2013 |1st JSON: Release JSON lightweight recruiting standard

2014 |HR Open Standards: Consortium changes name to reflect complete openness and not limit to XML

2015 |JSON 4.0: Candidate HR-JSON 4.0 Standards (timecards and wellness)

2016 |Individual Certifications: Individual Certificate Program to further interoperability and satisfactions with HR OS standards

2018 |JSON Fully Supported: HR-JSON 4.1 Standards (Assessments, Benefits, Compensations, Interviewing, Recruiting, Screening, Timecard, Wellness)

2019 |New Workgroups: Employer and Earning Record, Contingent Staffing, Learner Record.

We continue to add more workgroups and projects to provide the best services and standards to the HR industry. Thank you to all the members, volunteers, staff, and Board of Directors who have contributed to the Standards over the last 20 years!

Icons made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com

9 January 2020

2019 STAR VOLUNTEERS




Every year HR Open Standards recognizes outstanding volunteers and their contributions within our workgroups. These volunteers are behind-the-scenes standards (and magic) creators. Thank you to everyone that participates in our workgroups. This year we’re pleased to present our Star Volunteer award to Usha Vedula of ADP and David Brunswold of Discovery Benefits. Congratulations and thank you for your hard work!

 

UshaVedulaUsha Vedula is a Principal Application Developer at ADP with over 13 years of experience designing and developing software systems for Human Capital Management. Usha is currently working on integrating external benefit carriers with the Work Force Now platform. As a member of the Benefits workgroup, she contributed to the 4.1 standard release and focuses on adding support for plan setup and spending account enrollments.

Usha holds a Master’s degree in Computer Science from Southern Polytechnic State University.

 

 

Dave-BrunsvoldDave Brunsvold is the Manager of Professional Services at Discovery Benefits LLC with 12 years of experience in the pre-tax spending account and COBRA industries.

Dave contributed to HR Open as a member of the Benefits workgroup for the 4.1 release, enhancing the ability for HR Open to support spending account integrations.