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9 January 2020

HR OPEN STANDARDS: A HISTORY




HR Open Standards is celebrating its 20th Anniversary this year. We want to share some of our milestones with you and show you how we got to be the only independent, non-profit, volunteer-led organization dedicated to the development and promotion of a standard suite of specifications to enable human resource related data exchanges.

HR Open Standards: A Timeline

1999 |Formation: First discussion about formation of a consortium in Alexandria, VA which results in HR-XML Consortium Inc. being organized in December 1999

2000 |1st Meeting: First HR-XML meeting in January. HR-XML releases DTD specification for Recruiting and Benefits

2001 |HR-XML: August 2001 released first XML standards

2003 |Product Certification: HR-XML introduces its first Product Certification Program

2003 |Additional Releases: Release HR-XML 2.0 and 2.5 Standards

2009 |HR-XML 3.0: Release HR-XML 3.0 and specifications

2012 |Online Training: Announce online training courses to support growing adoptions

2013 |1st JSON: Release JSON lightweight recruiting standard

2014 |HR Open Standards: Consortium changes name to reflect complete openness and not limit to XML

2015 |JSON 4.0: Candidate HR-JSON 4.0 Standards (timecards and wellness)

2016 |Individual Certifications: Individual Certificate Program to further interoperability and satisfactions with HR OS standards

2018 |JSON Fully Supported: HR-JSON 4.1 Standards (Assessments, Benefits, Compensations, Interviewing, Recruiting, Screening, Timecard, Wellness)

2019 |New Workgroups: Employer and Earning Record, Contingent Staffing, Learner Record.

We continue to add more workgroups and projects to provide the best services and standards to the HR industry. Thank you to all the members, volunteers, staff, and Board of Directors who have contributed to the Standards over the last 20 years!

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4 May 2015

How Standards Bolster Innovation




Written by: Romuald Restout

A Quick Look into the Past

 

Towards the end of the 19th century, electrical engineering became one of the core engines of the second industrial revolution. As Nicholas Carr put it, in “The Big Switch,” manufacturing energy provided factories “with a decisive advantage over other manufacturers. The company was able to expand the yield and efficiency of its factory. […] Like other factories of the time, they were as much in the business of manufacturing energy as manufacturing goods”. This of course, quickly changed, as power plants started to rise and provide energy at a low-cost to everyone.

An aspect that is often overlooked in that story is that none of this could have happened without the emergence of standards.

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22 April 2015

Standards are Worthless Unless You Use Them




Written by: Mike Seidle

A good standard is one everyone uses.

Well, duh, right?

While I was on the board of directors for an international standards consortium (HR Open Standards), the biggest battle has always been getting developers to use the standard.  When we did, we got amazing things to happen, like getting 18 states to start providing compliance receipts for job deliveries in just a few months. Like enabling entire marketplaces.

Nearly everyone who I’m aware of who launched an HR Open initiative has finished quickly for a few reasons:

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5 June 2012

8 Reasons Why Standards Like HR-XML Save Software Development Time




I’m John Kleeman, Chairman of Questionmark, the assessment management systems company. Here is why open specifications and standards like HR-XML save effort when developing software.

Suppose you are responsible for application A, and your customer needs it to integrate with application B. How do you do this?

One option is to build a proprietary interface, where you write code which connects A to B directly.

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